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Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs, and oxen in which the importance of improving the short-wooled breeds by a mixture of the Merino blood is deduced from actual practice. Together with some remarks on the advantages which have been derived from the use of salt. by Somerville, John Southey Somerville 15th baron

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Published by Printed for W. Miller in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sheep.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy John, Lord Somerville.
The Physical Object
Pagination137 p.
Number of Pages137
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23359347M

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Get this from a library! Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs, and oxen in which the importance of improving the short-wooled breeds by a mixture of the Merino blood is deduced from actual practice. Together with some remarks on the advantages which have been derived from the use of salt.. [John Southey Somerville Somerville, Baron]. Get this from a library! Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs and oxen: in which the importance of improving the short-wooled breeds of sheep, by a mixture of the merino blood, is demonstrated from actual practice . [John Southey Somerville Somerville, Baron]. Facts and Observations Relative to Sheep, Wool, Ploughs and Oxen: In Which the Importance of Improving the Short-Wooled Breeds of Sheep, by a Mixture Together with Some Remarks on The. Find all books from Harding, John. At you can find used, antique and new books, compare results and immediately purchase your selection at the best price. Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs and oxen: in which the importance of improving the short-wooled breeds of sheep, by a mixture of the merino blood, is demonstrated from actual practice: together with some remarks on the advantages which have been derived to the author's flock, from the use of salt, &c.

Facts and Observations Relative to Sheep, Wool, Ploughs, and Oxen - Scholar's Choice Edition. Find all books from John Southey Somervilleth Somerville. At you can find used, antique and new books, compare results and immediately purchase your selection at the best price. FACTS OBSERVATIONS RELATIVE TO SHEEP, WOOL, PLOUGHS, AND OXEN: IN WHICH THE IMPORTANCE OF IMPROVING THE SHOKT-WOOLL£0 BKEEDS BY A MIXTURE OF THE MERINO ELOOJD IS DEDUCED FROM ACTUAL PRACTICE, TOGETHER WITH SOME REMARKS ADVANTAGES, WHICH HAVE BEEN DERIVED FROM THE USE OF SALT. BY JOHN, LORD . JM probably referred to the third edition of John Southey Somerville’s Facts and Observations Relative to Sheep, Wool, Ploughs, and Oxen: In Which the Importance of Improving the Short-Wooled Breeds of Sheep, by a Mixture of the Merino Blood, is Demonstrated from Actual Practice; Together with Some Remarks on the Advantages Which Have Been Derived to the Author’s Flock, from the Use of Salt, .   Sheep can remember the faces of up to 50 other sheep as well as their shepherd. – Source. During WWI, Woodrow Wilson kept a flock of 48 sheep on the White House lawn to save money on groundskeepers. The sheep also earned $52, for the Red Cross through the auction of their wool. – Source.

Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs, and oxen: in which the importance of improving the short-woolled breeds by a mixture of the Merino blood is deduced from actual practice. Together with some remarks on the advantages, which have . Sheep, (Ovis aries), species of domesticated ruminant (cud-chewing) mammal, raised for its meat, milk, and sheep is usually stockier than its relative the goat (genus Capra); its horns, when present, are more divergent; it has scent glands in its face and hind feet; and the males lack the beards of usually have short tails. In all wild species of sheep, the outer coat. Goats and sheep were the most common livestock animals, providing meat, wool and milk. In Ancient Rome, oxen and sheep were the essential elements of wealth and their value is evident in the fact. Somerville’s publications included Facts and observations relative to sheep, wool, ploughs and oxen: in which the importance of improving the short-woolled breeds, by a mixture of the Merino blood is deduced from actual practice (London, ) and annotation in Robert Bakewell’s Observations on the Influence of Soil and Climate upon Wool (London, ).