Quantifying vulnerability to poverty
Read Online
Share

Quantifying vulnerability to poverty a proposed measure, applied to Indonesia by Lant Pritchett

  • 218 Want to read
  • ·
  • 41 Currently reading

Published by World Bank, East Asia and Pacific Region, Environment and Social Development Sector Unit in Washington, DC .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Indonesia.

Subjects:

  • Poverty -- Indonesia.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementLant Pritchett, Asep Suryahadi, Sudarno Sumarto.
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 2437, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 2347.
ContributionsSuryahadi, Asep., Sumarto, Sudarno, 1960-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3669363M
LC Control Number2002616201

Download Quantifying vulnerability to poverty

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The authors propose a simple expansion of those measures to quantify vulnerability to poverty. They define vulnerability as a probability, the risk that . Quantifying Vulnerability to Poverty: A Proposed Measure, Applied to Indonesia Abstract Vulnerability is an important aspect of households’ experience of poverty. Many households, while not currently “in poverty” recognize that they are vulnerable to events that could easily push them into poverty — a bad harvest, a lost job, an unexpected. The authors propose a simple expansion of those measures to quantify vulnerability to poverty. They define vulnerability as a probability, the risk that a household will experience at least one episode of poverty in the near future. A household is defined as vulnerable if it has odds, or worse of falling into poverty. 11 One way of thinking about this vulnerability to poverty is a formalization of the concept of “near poor,” which is often used to illustrate the sensitivity of poverty rates to the poverty line. Vulnerability defines “near poor” using a normalization based on the variability of changes in expenditures. This eliminates the arbitraryFile Size: KB.

Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, "Vulnerability, seasonality and poverty in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages Kurosaki, Takashi, "Targeting the Vulnerable and the Choice of Vulnerability Measures: Review and Application to Pakistan," PRIMCED Discussion Paper Series 1, Institute of Economic Author: Rashida Haq. Quantifying vulnerability to poverty - a proposed measure, applied to Indonesia. political economy of targeting;small number of household;national poverty reduction strategy;per capita expenditure;headcount poverty rate;measurement error;vulnerability Cited by: ABSTRACT Vulnerability is an important aspect of households' experience of poverty. Many households, while not currently "in poverty", recognize that they are vulnerable to events that could easily push them into poverty-a bad harvest, a lost job, an unexpected expense, an illness, an economic downturn. Most operational measures define poverty as some function of the . Quantifying Vulnerability to Poverty: A Proposed Measure, Applied to Indonesia.

Quantifying Vulnerability to Poverty in a Developing Economy Rashida Haq 1. INTRODUCTION The concept of vulnerability extends the idea of poverty to include idiosyncratic as well as aggregate risks which can be defined as the probability of being in poverty or to fall deeper into poverty in the future. It can be categorised on the micro-and . Within this context vulnerability to poverty has been conceptualized as the likelihood of falling below a consumption threshold, such as a poverty line (Pritchett et al., ), and as the variability of income or consumption (Glewwe and Hall, ).Cited by: 'Applying vulnerability to poverty concepts to real data remains a serious challenge. This book offers a set of strong papers taking on this challenge, identifying the many empirical problems in vulnerability research and suggests ways to overcome them. ' Stefan Dercon, Professor of Development Economics, Oxford.5/5(1). Since then poverty researchers have used two major thresholds, "$ a day" and "$2 a day". As discussed in Ravallion et al. ( Ravallion et al. .